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How often should you be washing your hair if you have seborrheic dermatitis?

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Seborrheic dermatitis is not something to be taken lightly. If you have it, you already know. 

You may notice patches and scales around the hairline, neck, and other areas of the body. 

You may feel self-conscious.

You may feel discomfort. 

All the contradictory information you find online doesn’t help.

But, we gathered every piece of info you need: from causes to treatments and habits that help or make things worse. 

Here’s how often to wash hair with seborrheic dermatitis and what products help!

Table of Contents:

  • What is seborrheic dermatitis?
  • What triggers seborrheic dermatitis?
  • What you should never do if you have seborrheic dermatitis?
  • What should you focus on when battling scalp buildup?
  • The connection between seborrheic dermatitis and hair loss
  • Why does your washing routine matter if you have seborrheic dermatitis?
  • How do you wash your hair with seborrheic dermatitis?
  • Here is how often to wash hair with seborrheic dermatitis?
  • Should you wash your hair daily if you have seborrheic dermatitis?
  • Should you choose an antifungal shampoo if you have scalp buildup?
  • Should you use a no-poo method to wash your hair?
  • Should you oil your scalp if you have seborrheic dermatitis?
  • What natural ingredients keep seborrheic dermatitis in check?
  • The benefits of aloe vera on seborrheic dermatitis
  • Tea tree essential oil helps seborrheic dermatitis
  • Apple cider vinegar properties relieve seborrheic dermatitis

        What is seborrheic dermatitis?

        Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic skin condition. It manifests with inflamed skin. It’s the inflammation of the oil glands that lead to scaling and itchy skin, covered in patches. 

        Seborrheic dermatitis is the definition of extra oily skin. It translates as “freely flowing oil.” It means that the sebum secreted by the oil glands is produced excessively. 

        seborrheic dermatitis hair

        While it may start with dandruff, this condition can cause an inflammatory process of the oil glands. More and more sebum is produced. 

        That’s when you can notice white scales falling from your scalp, ears, and face onto your shoulders.

        Sometimes, this skin ailment is not just a flaky scalp. Worsened seborrhea can manifest as scaly, crusty patches around the hairline, ears, neck, chest, and back, the navel or groin, and every oily area in the body.

        What triggers seborrheic dermatitis?

        While people may think an oily hair type is associated with this skin condition, seborrheic dermatitis is not restricted to a hair type.

        It can, however, be associated with other skin conditions, such as psoriasis, severe acne, or rosacea. 

        When it comes to causes, here’s what you should know. Seborrheic dermatitis can be triggered by: 

        • unbalanced glandular activity manifested at birth or during puberty
        • mental and physical stress
        • obesity
        • nervous system disorders such as strokes or Parkinson disease
        • hereditary traits

        What you should never do if you have seborrheic dermatitis?

        Here are some lifestyle hacks that will help you keep seborrheic dermatitis in check.

        healthy nutrition

        • Stay away from greasy, fatty foods. They aggravate seborrhea.
        • Alcohol also makes things worse and should be kept to a minimum.
        • It helps if you maintain a healthy weight. That will keep your hormones balanced.
        • Resting and anti-stress techniques are recommended. 
        • Whatever you do, keep your hands away from the areas affected by seborrhea. Rubbing the skin or scratching it can trigger infections, which will only make things worse.
        • A healthy, balanced diet will sustain your recovery.
        • The dermatitis is at its best during summertime. Dry winter air can make seborrhea worse, so make sure to protect yourself.
        • Avoid using styling products. Keep an eye on formulas that contain alcohol, which can cause flare-ups.
        • Use pieces of clothing and headpieces made from smooth textured materials. Natural fibers let air circulate, reducing the odds of developing irritations.

        What should you focus on when battling scalp buildup?

        How can you keep your hair healthy with seborrheic dermatitis? Going for a balanced lifestyle and a healthy hair care regimen will help.

        The connection between seborrheic dermatitis and hair loss

        Seborrhea generally doesn’t cause hair loss. But you could be battling an overgrowth of Malassezia, a type of yeast that is naturally found on the scalp, that also thrives in oily environments. 

        Malassezia can cause inflammation of the scalp when it grows out of control. That can make hair grow harder. 

        head itch

        In addition, the itching of the scalp usually triggers scratching. Excessive scratching can harm the hair follicles, and hair loss can result. 

        Fear not, hair loss from seborrheic dermatitis - be it from scratching or fungal overgrowth - is temporary. Hair will regenerate when the inflammation is treated.

        Why does your washing routine matter if you have seborrheic dermatitis?

        If you let your seborrheic dermatitis, get the hang of you, your scalp and hair will be extra oily and flaky.

         If you treat it harshly, you can end up with a dry scalp and brittle hair. More often than not, people dealing with seborrhea are recommended to wash their hair daily. 

        Should you? 

        The answer is not a clear yes or no. Your hair type and skin type can influence your washing routine.

        How do you wash your hair with seborrheic dermatitis?

        The following shampooing routine can help ease your seborrhea:

        • Loosen the scales gently using the tips of your fingers. Not your nails because you can irritate.
        • Apply the shampoo and scrub for ten minutes. 
        • Let the shampoo settle on the scalp, giving active ingredients the chance to do their magic.

        Here is how often to wash hair with seborrheic dermatitis?

        While observing skin flakes all over your hair and upper body might make you self-conscious, the itchy scalp has to be the most annoying symptom of seborrhea. 

        Your washing routine and the products you use will influence the progress or regression of this skin condition.

        • Washing your hair too often can strip it of its natural oils. Curly hair will need an intensive care plan than straight hair. Just like thick hair needs more frequent washes, as opposed to fine hair.
        • A sensitive scalp will need ingredients that don’t irritate and damage the skin. An extra oily scalp will need more clarifying ingredients, as opposed to a dry scalp, that will require more moisture. 

        Should you wash your hair daily if you have seborrheic dermatitis?

        In most cases of seborrhea, a daily wash is recommended. A daily cleanse will remove the excess oil and kill off the fungi and bacteria. 

        Should you choose an antifungal shampoo if you have scalp buildup?

        People dealing with seborrheic dermatitis are often prescribed medicated shampoos and treatments. Doctors usually recommend steroid creams and topical antifungal treatments, along with antifungal pills. 

        If you are dealing with this condition, you may be prescribed a dandruff shampoo containing ketoconazole, selenium sulfide, zinc pyrithione, salicylic acid. 

        The good news is that such products are effective. The bad news is that they can cause scalp and hair dryness. 

        You could end up with dry, brittle hair that is vulnerable to breakage.

        Should you use a no-poo method to wash your hair?

        Does no-poo make things worse or better if you have seborrheic dermatitis?

        If the dermatitis is triggered by dryness, washing your hair with a conditioner might help since you won’t be dehydrating the hair and scalp. 

        If we’re talking about excess sebum on the scalp washing with conditioner will make things worse. 

        Conditioners will deposit buildup and oils on the hair and scalp. While you may think conditioning agents will make the scales soft and fall apart, no-pooing will cause more buildup, hence exacerbating your seborrhea. 

        The American Academy of Dermatology Association recommends you use an alternative plan:

        • On day 1 use an anti-dandruff shampoo. Continue using it every other day.
        • On day 2 apply your shampoo. Continue using it every other day.

        Should you oil your scalp if you have seborrheic dermatitis?

        If you’ve been diagnosed with seborrhea, you already know the yeast on the scalp thrives in an oily environment. 

        Avoid using oily cosmetics. 

        Water-based cosmetics are your best friends. Treating excess sebum is a delicate thing. 

        You need balance: preventing dryness and using anti-microbial compounds.

        What natural ingredients keep seborrheic dermatitis in check?

        While severe cases of seborrheic dermatitis may require intense treatment options, you can choose natural ingredients to complete your routine. 

        How can you cure your seborrheic dermatitis naturally? Give these natural remedies a chance:

        The benefits of aloe vera on seborrheic dermatitis

        The greasy scales of seborrhea need gentle moisturization. 

        While oils are out of the question, humectants such as aloe vera can help bring hydration. 

        Aloe is also a mild cleanser and a great purifier without stripping the hair of its natural oils.

        Tea tree essential oil helps seborrheic dermatitis

        What kills seborrheic dermatitis on the scalp? 

        You can complete your medical treatment with Tea tree oil. This oil has antibacterial and antifungal properties. 

        It can remove excess sebum and keep overgrowth in check. It also helps clarify the buildup on the scalp.

        Apple cider vinegar properties relieve seborrheic dermatitis

        The sebaceous glands can be balanced with the help of apple cider vinegar rinses. We recommend you use an apple cider vinegar-based shampoo as a regular shampoo. 

        ACV shampoo, apple cider vinegar shampoo, wow hair care, buywow

        This natural ingredient will keep the pH levels of the scalp balanced. It will help clear buildup without causing dryness.

        As you can see, tackling seborrheic dermatitis is a multi-faceted battle. While it may seem overwhelming, retrieving your wonderful luscious hair and getting rid of that pesky itch is not to be taken lightly. 

        And, yes, it can be done!

        Iulia Claudia Dumitru

        I feel happy when I get to tell meaningful stories. About people. About the world. About life. About what people need to feel good. Healthy food, a balanced lifestyle, a grateful approach to relationships with others and ourselves. That is how I keep myself grounded and purposeful. That is how I aim to contribute: striving to make ourselves the best we can. Creating life in the little things. Living every day with the joy, wonder, and curiosity of a child. Trying to #seeKbeauty. Inside and out.

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