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How to Get Super Glue Off Your Skin With Minimal Skin Damage

3 mins

Himani Bose

Understand the effects of super glue on skin and what super glue burns are. Then see how to get super glue off your skin with minimally damaging techniques.

Super glue was made to be an extremely powerful adhesive. It quickly forges a bond that secures wood, rubber, plastic, and other materials in a matter of seconds and won't let it go. It's simple to get stuck quickly if you unintentionally glue your fingers together to a cup you're repairing or to a table leg. 

In this article, we'll understand what super glue does to the skin, what is meant by super glue burns, and finally, how to get super glue off your skin.

Table of Contents:

  • What Super Glue Does to the Skin
  • What Are Super Glue Burns?
  • How to Get Super Glue Off Your Skin With Minimal Damage
  • Soap and water
  • Acetone
  • Lemon juice
  • Oils
  • Laundry detergent

    What Super Glue Does to the Skin

    Just like it does to surfaces, super glue adheres to the skin quickly. Super-glued skin can tear when you attempt to pull it apart. Occasionally, this kind of glue may also result in burns. 

    There shouldn't be any long-lasting damage to the skin. Super glue tends to disintegrate from the skin naturally in a few days. 

    Washing the affected area with soap and water or applying acetone will accelerate the process. Consult your doctor if the glue doesn't start to dissolve in a couple of days or if you experience a burn or rash.

    washing the hands

    You should go to the emergency room if you happen to get super glue on or near your eyes, nose, or mouth. Ingesting super glue or even inhaling its fumes can be very dangerous, and you may have to call the poison control center.

    What Are Super Glue Burns?

    Super glue is not hot, but it still has the potential to cause burns. The adhesive substance in super glue, cyanoacrylate, interacts with cotton, such as the fabric of your clothes to produce a reaction. It may result in a red, blistering burn. 

    Avoid getting super glue on cotton clothes, tissues, and other items that could cause a burn when using it. Wash the burnt area with water to treat it. Put on a sterile dressing and an antibiotic ointment. Consult a physician if the burn is severe or involves a large area of skin.

    How to Get Super Glue Off Your Skin With Minimal Damage

    Do not panic if your skin or fingers are stuck together or to something else. Using one of the following methods is usually sufficient to get super glue off your skin.

    • Soap and water

    Soaking the affected skin in a warm soap and water solution may be helpful when the super glue has not yet dried completely. 

    Place soap and very warm water — not hot — in a bowl or other vessel.

    Soak the area that is affected first. When the glue softens, try rubbing the skin in a rotational movement to separate the skin. If it hurts or feels like it might start tearing the skin, stop.

    Avoid using paper towels or tissues because they might stick to your skin.

    soap and foam
    • Acetone

    Acetone, a potent solvent present in almost all commercial nail polish removers, can be used to dissolve the super glue if soap is ineffective in doing so. 

    Be aware that acetone-based products can dry, irritate, and crack the skin while removing super glue from it. Make sure to use the smallest amount possible and avoid mixing it with other substances. 

    Clean the skin with soap and warm water after the super glue has been released. After that, use a hydrating moisturizer on the area to help the skin recover.

    the best body lotion

    Additionally, acetone can burn cracked or damaged skin, so avoid using it there.

    • Lemon juice

    Super glue can be removed with the help of the acidic nature of lemon juice. Small super glue patches and areas that have been glued together can be separated using this remedy. 

    Add lemon juice to a bowl. Soak the skin for five to ten minutes. The lemon juice should then be applied directly to the area using a soft brush or cotton swab. To remove the glue, rub the skin using a dry washcloth. Next, wash your hands, and moisturize them.

    lemon benefits
    • Oils

    Oils or oily food items like butter can make the super glue disintegrate and help separate your fingers from each other. You can use oils that are easily available such as olive or coconut. 

    First, soak your fingers in a bowl of warm (not hot) water. Then slowly rub the oil into your skin to disintegrate the bond. Keep in mind that this may take some time, but it's one of the most skin-safe ways to get super glue off your skin. 

    Continue adding oil and massaging it into your skin until the super glue has dissolved completely.

    • Laundry detergent

    Laundry detergent works similarly to soap and water but is more potent. All you need is to mix 1/4th cup of detergent with one cup of warm water and run the mixture into the affected area for about 20 seconds. The glue should easily disintegrate with this.

    Note that this can also dry out your skin the way acetone does, especially if your skin is sensitive. So, remember to follow up with a moisturizer or a skin-friendly oil such as castor oil.

    wow castor oil

    If your fingers are stuck together with super glue or your skin is stuck to another surface, you can get the glue off with some simple methods. Try one or more of the methods given above in the 'how to get super glue off your skin with minimal damage' section, and the glue should come off easily!

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    Himani Bose

    Himani is a beauty blogger and self-professed skincare connoisseur with over four years of experience in writing in the beauty industry. She has worked closely with beauty experts, dermatologists, hairstylists, and makeup artists for bringing all things best in beauty to her readers.

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    Himani Bose

    Himani is a beauty blogger and self-professed skincare connoisseur with over four years of experience in writing in the beauty industry. She has worked closely with beauty experts, dermatologists, hairstylists, and makeup artists for bringing all things best in beauty to her readers.
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